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Panasonic Improves on Output Temperature Coefficient for Solar Cells

Panasonic has achieved an output temperature coefficient of -0.258%/°C2 with its Panasonic HIT® (heterojunction solar cells).

The output temperature coefficient measures decrease in conversion efficiency with increase in temperature. The standard value for the coefficient is -0.50% /°C2 (0.5% decrease in efficiency with 1° rise in temperature).

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Mukesh Sethi, Group Manager, Solar Division, Panasonic Eco-Solutions North America, said “The Panasonic HIT® is proven to offer the very best value to consumers in the residential solar market, and this latest development will be a massive help in locations where extreme heat is a factor for consumers.”

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Top 20 of the Solar Power Market – Report

 

Visiongain has released Top 20 Solar Companies Report 2017. The report covers topics such as evolution of the solar power market, political and technological factors influencing the market, PEST analysis of strengths and weaknesses of the market, market leaders, etc.

The companies covered in the report include First Solar, Canadian Solar Inc., Enel Green Power, Trina Solar Limited, Kyocera Corporation, JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd., Sharp Corporation, JA Solar Holdings Co. Ltd., Yingli Solar, ReneSola, etc. The report is available here.

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Massachusetts’s Solar Program is Flawed

Solar advocates and nonprofit organizations have voiced their concern about the Baker administration’s new Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) program. The advocates acknowledge the positive move by the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) to create a good program. But, according to them, in its current state the program doesn’t offer solar savings to most affordable housing projects.

According to Mark Sandeen, co-founder and president of MassSolar, “We are concerned that the SMART program as currently proposed, may impose administrative hurdles and set compensation rates so low that continued development of low-income solar will become impossible.”

“SMART could be a positive development for solar, but without a program that expands sharing and offers a fair compensation for solar production, many in our communities, especially the low income tenants we serve, will be left behind by the solar revolution,” according to said Gail Latimore, Executive Director of the Codman Square Neighborhood Development Corporation in Dorchester.